December 28, 2009

Doodling can help your audience concentrate



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"You know you're bored when you start shading in the squares of your notebook. Apparently it's a habit that could be helping you to concentrate."

In a recent article on the BPS Research Digest blog, a study is described in which subjects were asked to listen to a dull phone message, without memorizing it, and then write down some details from the message. Half of the partcipants were asked to doodle while listening, by shading in squares and circles on their note paper.

"Afterwards, the doodlers had noted fractionally more of the correct names (7.8 on average vs. 7.1 - a statistically significant difference). What's more, moments later, the doodlers also excelled in a surprise memory test of the guests' names and the places mentioned in the message, recalling 29 per cent more details than the non-doodlers."

More research needs to be done into how and why the brain behaves this way, but it backs up anecdotal evidence that "secondary tasks aren't always a distraction from primary tasks, but can sometimes actually be beneficial." Read the full article here.

So remember, when you notice that guy in your presentation who never looks up from his Blackberry, he might be remembering what you said better than the woman next to him!

Here are two previous posts that touch on the same subject:

Is your audience paying attention?

Reading your audience

And here's a post on how toys are helpful to participants:


Toys and candy, a speaker's best friend

3 comments. Please add yours! :

Simon, presentations training in the UK said...

Interesting point. As you say, there's more research needed - including, in the example you give, of looking into which task WAS the secondary task.

My personal guess is that someone using a Blackberry actually *wont* remember more, because you can't use one subconsciously - you've got to concentrate on the tech, rather than concentrate on the presemtation while doodling with pencil and paper (which is something you *can* do without conscious thought...

Elad Sherf said...

Hey Lisa,
Thanks for this, Interesting!
It reminds me of this - http://tinyurl.com/yhl7joh - including your own comment on that post. It is a myth that concentration only comes from staring at the presenter...
Thanks
Elad

Lisa Braithwaite said...

I don't know, Simon, my husband plays games on his computer pretty mindlessly... maybe some of those Blackberry users are doing the same thing!

Thanks for your comment, Elad, and the reference back to our previous conversation!

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