July 23, 2013

Transitions: Making the connection between ideas



You've probably never noticed this when you're watching TV, but commercials have only a vague connection to the TV shows they interrupt. Commercials are chosen for a particular time slot based on demographics - the age, gender, income, education and other details about the people who watch shows on that network. There's rarely a transition or any relationship to the program besides these demographics.

Which is why I found this ad that plays during "Major Crimes" to be so clever. At the end of the scene, there's some imagery of police lights and sticky notes on a whiteboard tracing the timeline of a crime. The following text plays over the images:

"Great cases are solved by innovative thinking... Great cars are designed by it."

There's a voiceover while the Major Crimes, TNT and Volvo logos are shown: "Major Crimes on TNT is presented by Volvo."

Then the Volvo commercial begins. Unfortunately, I'm unable to find this clip online, so you'll just have to imagine it.

It's a very clever and original transition from TV show to commercial, actually making a connection between what we've been watching and what advertisers would like us to watch next. (If you DVR your shows like I do, you probably wouldn't watch the commercial anyway. But because it doesn't go straight to commercial, this transition caught my eye and kept me engaged for an extra few moments.)

In public speaking, transitions are like the links in a chain, connectors between our ideas. They keep the audience intrigued and interested enough to keep listening for what's coming next, and they help your content flow and make sense as one cohesive package. Here's a post I wrote about ten ways to transition to your next idea.

Are you making these connections for your audience?

4 comments. Please add yours! :

Peter Billingham said...

Hi Lisa - It's the "Law of the Harvest" - you reap what you sow ... another bit of ancient wisdom I find that inspires me is - "So let’s not allow ourselves to get fatigued doing good. At the right time we will harvest a good crop if we don’t give up, or quit. Right now, therefore, every time we get the chance, let us work for the benefit of all…” And you are so right practice now!

Thanks for another great post!

Lisa Braithwaite said...

Thanks for your comment, Peter. You always add another dimension to what I've written. :-)


LB

Tammy Whitten said...

Love this analogy, Lisa! I garden (ahem, I attempt to garden as much as the squirrels, rabbits, and birds allow) and this really struck me and put into words what I've been doing for way too long! I've had these great ideas that I want to do in my business, but I've spent too much time getting ready to get ready to get ready. I've read e-newsletters and blog posts, signed up for webinar after webinar and even done some coaching. But I was AFRAID to get out there and DO IT! I kept talking about planting my blueberry bush so to speak. But now I'm in the midst of doing it- prepping and starting to share what I've been wanting to do. And it's GREAT! It's such a rush. And now I'm wondering, "Why did it take me so stinking long?"

Lisa Braithwaite said...

We all do it, Tammy. The trick is recognizing it and stopping the pattern! Sounds like you're well on your way!

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